Zagreb's Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary

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Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary

After the founding of the diocese in Zagreb, King Ladislav (1040-1095) probably did not build a new church, but designated the existing one as a cathedral. Only after his death did the construction of a new cathedral begin. It was completed in 1217 and consecrated by King Andrew II. (1205-1235) when he passed through the 5th Crusade here. As early as 1242, the Tatars demolished the newly built cathedral, so Bishop Stephen II. (1225-1247) for the needs of the cathedral worship had the chapel of St. Stephen the First Martyr.

Zagreb's Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary zagreb.hr

This Romanesque-Gothic building is now built into the Archbishop's table. Bishop Timotej (1263-1287) began the construction of a new, monumental cathedral in which the remains of the pre-Tatar cathedral were incorporated, and he dedicated it to St. Stephen, King of Hungary. He managed to build a central and two side apses with altars and a sacristy. The frescoes in the sacristy (iconographically very interesting - St. Quirinus between St. Dominic and St. Francis) are probably from the time of Bishop Augustin Kažotić (1303-1322). Bishop Eberhard (1397-1406 and 1410-1419) was responsible for the construction of three church naves (as evidenced by his episcopal coat of arms on the walls and pillars), and for Bishop Oswald Thuz (1466-1499) the whole building covered. Then the construction of the bell tower on the south side of the facade, which was completed only in the 17th century, as a Renaissance-Baroque building. Due to the Turkish threat, Bishop Thuz began construction of cathedral fortifications. The construction lasted until 1517, when they were completed by the administrator of the Zagreb diocese, the Archbishop of Ostrog,

Zagreb's Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary www.zagreb.hr

Toma Bakač. In front of the entrance to the cathedral, he built a tower named after him, Bakačeva. It was demolished after the last renovation of the cathedral in 1906. During the 17th century. the cathedral was repeatedly destroyed in large fires, but during the renovations its interior was enriched with valuable inventory - baroque altars (wooden and marble) and the pulpit of the sculptor Mihael Cusse (Kuša) which is still in the middle nave. The interior of the cathedral was enriched later. Bishop Aleksandar Alagović (1829.1837) acquired a painting of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which was placed on the main altar, and a choir. Archbishop Juraj Haulik (1837 - 1669) removed the altarpiece (he sold it to the parish church in Pregrada) and had the neo-Gothic main altar erected instead. In addition, in 1855 he acquired a large organ (3 manuals and a pedal and 53 registers) from the Walcker company in Ludwigsburg. The architecture of the organ closet is of neo-Gothic style. Finally Haulik had the windows of the sanctuary painted. These are the oldest stained glass windows in Croatia. In an effort to return the cathedral to its original appearance, the Viennese professor of architecture Friedrich Schmidt was invited to Zagreb and brought his student Hermann Bolle to Zagreb. However, the catastrophic earthquake of 1880 severely damaged the cathedral, so according to H. Bolle's designs, the cathedral was not only restored, but also received neo-Gothic features in its interior design. This was especially evident in the shape of the facade and two neo-Gothic bell towers (about 105 m high), which in 1902 defined the current appearance of the cathedral.

Zagreb's Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary zagabria